Waterhead Academy

Science

YEAR 7

 Curriculum Intention

 The year 7 Science schemes of work are part of a ‘spiralled curriculum’ which ensures   that pupils build on their KS2 learning and lay the foundations for the coming years,   allowing pupils to develop a powerful knowledge base.

 A robust focus on retrieval at the start of every lesson means that pupils continuously   develop their cumulative knowledge as they learn new information, as well as looking at ‘The Big Picture’ to make links and see how we use Science in everyday life

Curriculum Implementation

Autumn Term

Spring Term

Summer Term

Chemistry

·         The Particle Model

·         Elements and Compounds

·         Matter

·         Acids and Alkalis

·         Our Earth

Biology

·         Organisms

·         Photosynthesis & Respiration

·         Adaptation & Inheritance

·         Human Reproduction

Physics

·         Introduction to Forces

·         Magnetism

·         Energy

·         Waves

How Science Works

 Models, scientific journals, comparing properties of compounds and elements, state change investigations, comparing properties, spotting and recording observations for reactions, peer review, pH scale and indicators, gas tests

How Science Works

 Models, measuring, levers for antagonistic muscles, reaction times, effect of exercise on the body, lung capacity, anaerobic respiration of yeast, food tests, photosynthesis, starch tests, continuous and categoric variation, extracting DNA, making beaker babies

How Science Works

 Drag/friction, Hooke’s Law, investigating magnetic fields, electromagnetism, investigating speed, investigating levers and pulleys, oscilloscope traces, wave machine, energy in foods

 

YEAR 8

 Curriculum Intention

The year 8 Science schemes of work are part of a ‘spiralled curriculum’ which ensures that pupils build on their year 7 learning and lay the foundations for the coming years, allowing pupils to continue developing a powerful knowledge base.

A robust focus on retrieval at the start of every lesson means that pupils continuously develop their cumulative knowledge as they learn new information,  as well as looking at ‘The Big Picture’ to make links and see how we use Science in everyday life.

Curriculum Implementation

Autumn Term

Spring Term

Summer Term

Biology

·         Organisms – Cells

·         Plant Reproduction

·         Ecosystems

·         Evolution

Physics

·         Forces – Motion & Pressure

·         Electricity

·         Cost of energy

·         Waves – Sound

·         Waves – Light

Chemistry

·         Separation Techniques

·         Energy Changes

·         Chemical Reactions

·         Extraction and the Earth

How Science Works

 Microscopes, flower dissection, field investigations  for sampling (quadrats), tools for Darwin’s beaks, ethical issues, scientific journals, peer review

How Science Works

 Motion graphs, circuits, investigating stress, conduction, convection and radiation, oscilloscope traces, reflection, refraction, dispersion

How Science Works

Solubility, filtration, evaporation / crystallisation, distillation, chromatography, endothermic and exothermic reactions, energy changes, neutralisation, making a soluble salt, metal acid reactions, metal oxygen reactions, metal water reactions, electrolysis, gas tests, combustion demo

 

YEAR 9

Curriculum Intention

The year 9 Science schemes of work are part of a ‘spiralled curriculum’ which ensures that pupils build on their KS3 learning and embark on their GCSE journey, allowing pupils to continue developing a powerful knowledge base.  The students are taught in specialisms: Biology, Chemistry and Physics. In all specialisms, Required Practical (RP) activities are carried out, demonstrated or shown to students as part of the How Science Works content of the curriculum.

 Interleaving and self-testing are a feature of the curriculum alongside independent study. A robust focus on retrieval at the start of every lesson means that pupils continuously develop their cumulative knowledge as they learn new information, as well as looking at ‘The Big Picture’ to make links and see how we use Science in everyday life.

 Curriculum Implementation

Biology

Chemistry

Physics

·         Organisation & Digestive System

·         Organising Animals and Plants

·         Photosynthesis

·         Cell structure and Transport

 

 

·         Atomic Structure

·         The Periodic Table

·         Energy Changes

·         Rates and Equilibrium

·         Molecules & Matter

·         Forces in Balance

·         Conservation & Dissipation of Energy

 

How Science Works

 Enzyme conditions RP, Food tests RP, Heart dissection, Bell jar model of breathing, Xylem vessels in celery, Potometer demonstration,

Photosynthesis RP, Testing leaf for starch, Microscopy RP, Osmosis RP

 

How Science Works

Spotting a chemical reaction, Filtration, Evaporation / crystallisation, Distillation, Chromatography, Group 1 metals and water, Halogen displacement, endothermic and exothermic reactions,  Energy changes RP, Rate of reaction RP: (changing concentration) Disappearing X / Loss of mass / Gas syringe / Water bath / Comparing catalysts

 

How Science Works

 Investigating centre of mass, Density RP, Measuring the melting point of a substance, Measuring specific latent heat of ice or water, Demo – of how changes in temperature affect pressure, Hooke’s Law RP

 

Year 10

Curriculum Intention

The year 10 Science schemes of work are part of a ‘spiralled curriculum’ which ensures that pupils build on their year 9 learning and carry on their GCSE journey, allowing pupils to continue developing a powerful knowledge base. The students are taught in specialisms: Biology, Chemistry and Physics. In all specialisms, Required Practical (RP) activities are carried out, demonstrated or shown to students as part of the How Science Works content of the curriculum.

 Interleaving and self-testing are a feature of the curriculum alongside independent study. A robust focus on retrieval at the start of every lesson means that pupils continuously develop their cumulative knowledge as they learn new information, as well as looking at ‘The Big Picture’ to make links and see how we use Science in everyday life.

Biology

Chemistry

Physics

·         Cell Division

·         Respiration

·         Non-communicable diseases

·         Communicable diseases

·         Preventing & Treating disease

·         The Human Nervous System

·         Hormonal Control in Humans and Plants

·         Structure & Bonding

·         Chemical Changes

·         Electrolysis

·         Crude Oil & Fuels

·         Energy Transfer by Heating

·         Energy Resources

·         Motion

·         Force & Motion

·         Wave Properties

·         Electromagnetic Waves

How Science Works

 

Effect of exercise on body, anaerobic respiration in yeast, lung capacity, double blind trial using caffeinated/non-caffeinated drinks, reaction time RP, reflexes e.g. pupil dilation, knee jerk

How Science Works

 

State change investigations (melting & boiling), comparing ionic v covalent v metallic properties, metal displacement, making a soluble salt RP, electrolysis RP, fractional distillation demonstration, combustion demonstration, Cracking, alkene + bromine water demonstration

How Science Works

 

Reaction time challenge, investigating momentum, Stretch tests – RP,

Using solar cells to see what factors affect the output, Specific heat capacity RP, Radiation RP, Acceleration RP, Observing Waves RP

 

Year 11 

 Curriculum Intention

The year 11 Science schemes of work are part of a ‘spiralled curriculum’ which ensures that pupils build on their year 9 and 10 learning and prepare for their GCSE exams, tapping into their powerful knowledge base that they have developed. The students are taught in specialisms: Biology, Chemistry and Physics. In all specialisms, Required Practical (RP) activities are carried out, demonstrated or shown to students as part of the How Science Works content of the curriculum.

 Interleaving and self-testing are a feature of the curriculum alongside independent study. A robust focus on retrieval at the start of every lesson means that pupils are able to recall and retain information covered throughout their GCSE learning. Revision and exam preparation will be the main threads that run through the remaining schemes of work, ensuring that pupils are primed for success in their examinations.

Biology

Chemistry

Physics

·         Reproduction

·         Variation & Evolution

·         Genetics & Evolution

·         Adaptations, Interdependence & Competition

·         Organising an Ecosystem

·         Biodiversity & Ecosystems

·         Chemical Analysis

·         The Earth’s Atmosphere

·         The Earth’s Resources

·         Chemical Calculations

 

·         Radioactivity

·         Electric Circuits

·         Electricity in the Home

·         Electromagnetism

How Science Works

 

Making DNA helix with sweets, Extracting DNA from fruit, Variation in members of class and graph plotting, different things to pick up marbles with to investigate Darwin’s finches and beaks, Field investigations RP (Quadrats and Transects)

How Science Works

 

Fixed points for purity of substances, chromatography and Rf values RP, gas tests, Purification of water RP, Conservation of mass

 

How Science Works

 

Investigate the effect of resistors and diodes on circuits, Resistance of a wire  RP, IV characteristics RP,

Investigating potential difference in series circuits, Testing resistors in series and parallel circuits – RP, Measuring the power of electrical appliances, Magnets and magnetic fields, fields around a current carrying wire and force on a current carrying wire